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Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes Visits NWTC to Discuss Benefits of a Technical College Education

Home » News » 2022 » March » Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes Visits NWTC to Discuss Benefits of a Technical College Education
Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes and Mayor Genrich visit NWTC to discuss the benefits of a two-year education and the role it plays to meet workforce demands within the community.
Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes and Mayor Genrich visit NWTC to discuss the benefits of a two-year education and the role it plays to meet workforce demands within the community.
Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes visits NWTC to discuss the benefits of a two-year education and the role it plays to meet workforce demands within the community.

“What the students at Northeast Wisconsin Technical College are doing is what is going to fix our economy," said Lt. Governor Mandela Barnes, candidate for U.S. Senate. "They are getting a good education and putting themselves on a pathway to get good-paying jobs that are absolutely essential to our communities. I was proud to spend time with them today, and I will continue to advocate for more resources and support for technical colleges so students can get affordable, high-quality education to help them build their future — and build the future of Wisconsin.” 

Lt. Gov. Barnes was joined by Mayor Eric Genrich. During the visit, they met with students and leadership to discuss NWTC’s high-impact practices, which make higher education more accessible and lead to high-wage careers. 

"This is an important opportunity for our students to share, in their own words, how the community college experience made an impact on their lives and community,” said Dr. Rafn, NWTC president. 

The conversation focused on financial accessibility, student resources, closing equity gaps within high-wage careers. They also talked about the student experience and why a technical college education was the best fit for them.

“Not everyone can be a full-time student. The flexibility of technical college courses works so well because you can still have a job while pursuing your degree through online or evening classes,” said Macie Herm, NWTC student in Energy Management. 

Participating students ranged from various personal backgrounds who are pursuing careers within dairy science, early childhood education, renewable energy, farm production and more.

“I’m pursing my degree not necessarily because I need to, but because I choose to. Even after 10 years within my field I am still learning. I think it’s important that we lead by example, and the asset of a quality education is invaluable,” said Keegan Pries, NWTC student in Early Childhood Education. 

NWTC offers training in over 200 high demand career fields, and 91% of NWTC graduates are employed within six months of graduation. 

Enrollment for NWTC’s next 8-week session, which begins in March, is available now. To learn more about the College’s student services and academic opportunities, visit NWTC Admissions. 
 

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